School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Dr Lorenzo Jamone

Lorenzo

Lecturer in Robotics

Email: l.jamone@qmul.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 20 7882 7825
Room Number: Peter Landin, CS 407
Website: http://lorejam.blogspot.co.uk/

Teaching

Advanced Robotics Systems (Robotics III) (Undergraduate)

The module will build on previous knowledge acquired in the previous years on the programme and also introduce new and advanced concept related to geometric, kinematic, and dynamic robots manipulation, vision and machine learning specifically for Robotics, motion control and practical implementation of locomotion solutions, mechanical considerations of medical robots and the necessity of understanding acceptance and ethical values, etc. It will introduce the practicality of applying multidisciplinary techniques in enhancing the current state of the art in Robotics Engineering and allow the students to explore creative and engineered solutions that are outside the box along side conventional industrial and cognitive applications.

Advanced Robotics Systems (Robotics III) (Postgraduate)

The module will introduce both basic and advanced concepts related to geometric, kinematic, and dynamic robots manipulation, vision and machine learning specifically for Robotics, motion control and practical implementation of locomotion solutions, mechanical considerations of medical robots and the necessity of understanding acceptance and ethical values, etc. It will introduce the practicality of applying multidisciplinary techniques in enhancing the current state of the art in Robotics and allow the students to explore creative and engineered solutions that are outside the box along side conventional industrial and cognitive applications.

Cognitive Robotics (Postgraduate)

This module addresses the emerging field of autonomous systems possessing artificial reasoning skills and also environment and context awareness. The module will introduce students to advance numerical and computational techniques associated with machine learning and artificial intelligence. Successfully-applied algorithms and autonomy models form the basis for study, and provide students an opportunity to design such a system as part of their coursework project. Theory and practical applications will be linked through discussion of real systems such as medical robotic surgeons and robotic musicians.

Cognitive Robotics (Robotics IV) (Undergraduate)

This module addresses the emerging field of autonomous systems possessing artificial reasoning skills and also environment and context awareness. The module will introduce students to advance numerical and computational techniques associated with machine learning and artificial intelligence. Successfully-applied algorithms and autonomy models form the basis for study, and provide students an opportunity to design such a system as part of their coursework project. Theory and practical applications will be linked through discussion of real systems such as the medical robotic surgeons and robotic musicians.

Skills for Electronic Engineering (Undergraduate)

This module is designed to support first year students in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science through the transition from school to university. It will provide students with the opportunity to work with others to develop and share basic practical skills that underpin many EECS first year modules, foster a sense of enquiry and intellectual curiosity, develop basic graduate attributes that underpin effective student learning, and prepare and encourage students to obtain some work / voluntary experience at an early stage in order to enhance their employability.

Skills for Robotics Engineering (Undergraduate)

This module is designed to support first year students on the MEng Robotics Engineering programme through the transition from school to university. It will provide students with the opportunity to work with others to develop and share basic practical skills that underpin many first year modules and beyond, foster a sense of enquiry and intellectual curiosity, develop basic graduate attributes that underpin effective student learning, and prepare and encourage students to obtain some work / voluntary experience at an early stage in order to enhance their employability.

Research

Research Interests:

I am Lecturer in Robotics and Director of the CRISP group at the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) of the Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The CRISP group is part of ARQ (Advanced Robotics at Queen Mary).
Since October 2018, I am also Turing Fellow at The Alan Turing Institute.

My main interest is in Cognitive Robotics: building intelligent robots by taking inspiration from humans, and validating theories of human cognition by testing computational models on robots.
Topics include: dexterous manipulation, visuo-haptic perception and exploration, object affordances, tool use, body schema, eye-hand coordination, human-robot interaction and collaboration, tactile and force sensing.

I also collaborate with VisLab, at the Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica of the Instituto Superior Tecnico (Lisbon, Portugal), as visiting associate researcher in humanoid and cognitive robotics, and with SuganoLab, at the Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering of Waseda University (Tokyo, Japan), as visiting professor in tactile sensing for robotic manipulation.

Before I was with the Biped Group of Takanishi Lab (Waseda University), and with the RBCS (Robotics Brain and Cognitive Science) Department of the IIT (Italian Institute of Technology). 

Publications